About Us

Our mission. Citizens for Criminal Justice Reform works for a just, humane, and restorative judicial and correctional system by means of research, public education, legislative advocacy, coalition building, community organizing, and litigation. We support rational, cost-effective programs and policies that reduce crime, lower recidivism, and make our society safer.

Our vision. CCJR seeks a system of justice that protects the community while promoting the rehabilitation of offenders and the well-being of inmate families.

Our goals

  • Build, empower, and mobilize an active statewide coalition.
  • Debunk common myths and stereotypes about prison and offenders.
  • Reform the criminal justice process to make it more restorative and less adversarial.
  • Promote alternatives to incarceration which are less costly and more effective than prison, such as fines, counseling, community service, and restitution.
  • Advocate for programs that maintain relationships between inmates and their loves ones.
  • Work to reintegrate offenders back into their families and communities.
  • Address addiction as a healthcare issue, not as a criminal offense, and redirect resources to prevention and treatment.
  • Oppose mandatory minimum sentences and dangerous overcrowding in our jails and prisons.
  • Serve as a networking resource for prisoners and their families.
 
“The Granite State has long needed a voice like CCJR to challenge the myths behind decades of draconian state policies on crime.” — Chris Dornin, a former correctional counselor, retired State House reporter, and the founder of Citizens for Criminal Justice Reform. 
 

Help make a difference.
Become a member of CCJR-NH.
Click here to join.

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“What we can’t do alone, we can do together.”
Membership Lists are Strictly Confidential.
 
All Donations are Tax Deductible
 
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  "Justice denied anywhere — diminishes justice everywhere." —Martin Luther King

Governor signs earned time bill

It took three challenging years for New Hampshire prisoners to win themselves a decent chance to earn modest sentence reductions. Make that five years if you count all the ups and downs in the fight over SB 500, the Criminal Justice Reinvestment Act of 2010.

Life On the List

When Josh Gravens was 12 years old, he made a terrible mistake. He and his sister, who was 8, had sexual contact, twice. “Like, where my body part touched her body part,” he says. “It was never penetrative. Obviously, it couldn’t have been what they call consensual, but it was playing.”

Time Machine

While doing some carpentry for a customer last week I saw a photo of a family on a ski slope. The guy looked a lot like Dave. I couldn’t remember the last time I’d thought about him.

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